Literacy

English Equality Statement

English Equality Statement

In Literacy we consider that meaningful education should enable pupils to:

    • Study broad, balanced and relevant reading and writing.
    • Take part in interesting lessons which both stimulate and challenge.
    • Develop questioning, listening, thinking and Computing skills.

 

Racial Equality Statement

 

We are firmly committed to promoting equality. We seek to create a learning environment where the diversity, needs and achievements of all members of the school community are recognised, valued and celebrated.

 

Access and Inclusion

The Early Years Foundation Stage encourages children to develop positive attitudes about themselves as well as to people who are different from them.  It encourages children to empathise with others and begin to develop the skills of critical thinking. Through the activities and support offered by the our setting, we will promote positive, non-stereotyping images about diverse racial groups, people with disabilities or special educational needs and disabilities (SEND), religious backgrounds and lifestyle choices in order to help children to value other people’s ideas and contributions.

We will do all that we are able to ensure that all children are able to participate in the activities offered by our setting and are able to overcome barriers to participation, which may relate to sensory or physical impairment, learning difficulties or emotional or social development, or may relate to factors in their environment. We believe that curriculum access is principally about entitlement, equal opportunity and equal value. We promote equality and diversity through our assemblies and displays.

All pupils have full access to the English curriculum. The content and mode of delivery of the curriculum will be modified to help support all pupils in accessing the curriculum offered. We aim to develop increasingly independent learners and provide opportunities for pupils to extend their experience and knowledge outside their world experience to help support them in preparing for future life. Pupils’ progress will be carefully monitored to ensure their access to the curriculum is appropriately supported and where necessary modified to reflect changing circumstances.

The English curriculum recognises that pupils have individual learning styles and interests; it aims to take into account pupils’ age, cognitive, social and emotional level of functioning in the design and delivery of the curriculum offered.

The English curriculum aims to encourage a climate in which all pupils can learn to the best of their ability and where all pupils’ special educational needs and disabilities (SEND) are addressed positively and sensitively.

Equal Opportunities

We are determined to ensure that all pupils have an equal opportunity to learn and achieve success appropriate to their need and abilities. We work to ensure that, wherever possible, all pupils have full access to the English curriculum; this right is under constant review to ensure we do not discriminate against any individual or group. To ensure all pupils have the opportunity to achieve their potential we:

    • Use support in the classroom appropriately to prevent pupils with additional barriers to learning being disadvantaged.
    • Establish a learning ethos that challenges discrimination, aggression, racism, gender bias or loss of opportunity and consistently celebrates all pupils’ achievements.
    • Provide a curriculum that promotes independence and addresses issues of self esteem and confidence.
    • Consistently promote positive behaviour, using effective teacher role modelling and clear boundaries and expectations.
    • Ensure that teaching styles and approaches to teaching are appropriately matched to the learning needs of the pupils.

Valuing diversity in families

    • We welcome the diversity of family lifestyles and work with all families.
    • We encourage children to contribute stories of their everyday life to our setting, through photo albums of our families, projects and general discussions etc.
    • We encourage parents/carers to take part in the life of the school and to contribute fully, e.g. through news letters, topic letters, social and fund raising events.

Differentiation

All units of work in English are differentiated to meet the broad levels of attainment of each year group.

To enable all pupils to gain access to the curriculum the teacher is responsible for ensuring that the teaching support and teaching assistants working in the class have access to the lesson plans.

A range of differentiation strategies are used in English to enable all pupils to access the curriculum, these include differentiation by:

    • Task – Tasks will vary in difficulty and style, materials may be varied or pupils will have specific tasks related to the same material.
    • Text – Written texts may be differentiated for reading age, length and font size.
    • Questioning – A large range of questions will be used so that pupils can respond at a level matched to their level of understanding.
    • Outcome – Pupils may be presented with a common practical task, the task may have an open-ended outcome in order to allow pupils to work at their own pace and level of attainment and yet provide opportunities for extension and challenge.
    • Support – Support may exist in many forms, but in English it includes scaffolds, key words (teacher, LSA, TA, peer group) writing frames and model answers.

English Policy

Leopold Primary School – English Policy 2015

The English policy must be read alongside other school policies including:

    • Homework policy
    • Curriculum and Planning policy
    • Early Years Foundation Stage policy
    • Gifted and talented policy
    • Special Needs policy
    • Assessment policy
    • Single equality scheme

This policy also should be read alongside the new National Curriculum in England (published September 2013) and other documents from the Standards and testing Agency.

Our Curriculum overview, medium and short term planning help to support this policy, as will a look at these relevant schemes of work for each Key Stage. These include:

    • Phonics
    • Grammar and Punctuation
    • Spelling

Rationale

 

At Leopold, we aim to develop in the children we teach, an enthusiasm for literacy in all its forms and the confidence to express themselves both orally and through the written word. We recognise how essential this is for the children’s development, it is part of the ‘essential knowledge’ (p6 National Curriculum) that is needed in society.

By developing a comprehensive range of reading skills we aim to foster in the children a love and appreciation of a variety of literature. These skills will enable them to access all aspects of the curriculum. ‘Teachers should develop pupil’s spoken language, reading, writing and vocabulary as integral aspects of the teaching of every subject. English is both a subject in its own right and the medium for teaching; for pupils, understanding the language provides access to the whole curriculum. Fluency in the English language is an essential foundation for success in all subjects.’ (p10 National Curriculum)

Planning

 

In Key Stage One and Key Stage Two, teachers plan together using the new National Curriculum framework. All teachers use Hamilton Trust and/or Collins English schemes of work as a basis of their planning. This allows them to adapt the lessons to suit the needs of the children in their classes. These plans all match the criteria of the new curriculum. All aspects of English are covered in the lessons including reading, writing, poetry, speaking and listening, drama, role play and a love of reading is promoted across the school. All teachers plan on a weekly basis working from the medium term plans provided by Hamilton Trust and Collins English schemes to devise detailed and differentiated weekly plans.

Reading

In Leopold, we recognise the importance of reading. In the National Curriculum reading is singled out as of extreme importance, since through it ‘pupils have a chance to develop culturally, emotionally, intellectually, socially and spiritually’ (p13) Reading allows pupils to ‘acquire knowledge’ and to ‘build on what they already know’ (p13).

The 2014 Curriculum divides reading skills into two dimensions:

    • Word reading/ decoding
    • Comprehension

All teachers recognise that both these elements are essential to success and we support the acquisition of both sets of skills through various methods. We recognise that these areas are clearly linked to the other aspects of English learning: speaking and listening, writing, grammar and vocabulary. We also understand that reading is a developmental process and part of life-long learning and we encourage and praise children at every stage of it.

In Leopold we aim/provide for/to:

    • Pupils to learn to read easily and fluently. This is achieved through daily phonics in Key Stage One, regular reading to adults in school, reading partners and reading at home regularly.
    • Pupils to be encouraged to read widely, through our use of differing class texts, reading records, library visits and high quality attractive books in classrooms.
    • Pupils are encouraged to read for pleasure using reading partners, quiet reading time, listening to an adult read, reading passports and the various methods outlined above.
    • Pupils also need to read to find information in all lessons and comprehension is assessed in a formal way every term.
    • Pupils are exposed to a range of texts from their literacy heritage during their school career.
    • Pupils often look at books in guided reading sessions.
    • Teachers read a class book to all students in each Key Stage.
    • Key Stage two children are offered booster lessons to help their understanding.
    • Pupil Premium students are given extra lessons on a Monday for an hour to help their understanding.

Writing

 

At Leopold we understand that children should: develop the stamina and skills to write at length, use accurate spelling and punctuation, be grammatically correct, write in a range of ways and purposes including narratives, explanations, descriptions, comparisons, summaries and evaluations and write to support their understanding and consolidation of what they have heard or read. This is in accordance with the guidance in the National Curriculum.

The 2014 Curriculum divides writing skills into two dimensions:

    • Transcription (spelling and handwriting)
    • Composition (articulating ideas in speech and writing)

All teachers recognise that both these elements are essential to success and we support the acquisition of both sets of skills through various methods. We recognise that these areas are clearly linked to the other aspects of English learning: speaking and listening, writing, grammar and vocabulary. We also understand that reading is a developmental process and part of life-long learning and we encourage and praise children at every stage of it.

At Leopold we aim/provide for/to:

    • Teach grammar included in other English lessons, allowing the children to see and use the devices in normal practice.
    • We correct grammatical errors orally and in written work (where appropriate)
    • We have a systematic approach, we revisit key learning and build upon it in all areas from phonics, through to grammar and spelling
    • We use high quality texts, modelling and shared/collaborative writing to demonstrate good practice
    • We provide writing frames to support the least confident
    • We provide time for planning, editing and revising
    • We mark extended pieces of work in-depth and set targets with the pupil
    • We allow for pupils to self-assess or peer assess, when appropriate so they can evaluate effectively
    • We encourage cursive handwriting to support spelling and speed
    • We use drama and hot-seating to help pupils to think about another point of view
    • Support for pupils with learning and motor difficulties
    • Meetings with parents to help them support their child
    • Pupil Premium students are given extra lessons on a Monday for an hour to help their understanding.

Assessment and monitoring

 

In the foundation stage, a foundation profile is built up during their first year. At the end of Key Stage One, the children take SATS tests in reading, writing, spelling and grammar (2016). In Year 3, 4 and 5, the children sit the QCA English tests. At the end of Key Stage Two, the children take SATS English tests in reading, writing, spelling and handwriting. Each class takes an optional SATS test at the end of each year.

All these results are recorded on to target setting sheets. The end of Key Stage SATS test results and QCA test results are reported to parents. Each half term, teachers level children’s reading and writing, basing the assessment on general class work. These are based on Target Tracker steps. Teachers write an English comment on the Pupil Record Sheets or the annual report.

Teachers keep informal records (e.g. spelling test results, progress reports) and marking comments provide information and feedback. Children are given writing targets based on their Steps target found on Target Tracker. They are also given ‘I can’ statements relating to their reading level to put in their reading record books.

English Events

 

A whole school reading breakfast has been held. Visits from authors, poets, librarians and illustrators are organised. Regular literary events such as author workshops also take place. Book Fairs are also held twice a year to encourage parents to buy books for their children. We organise literacy trips for the children to engage them in the literate world around them.

Handwriting

In Leopold, we place a high value on children making their handwriting neat and presentable by using cursive script.

Our aims are:

 To have a consistent cursive approach across the whole school to ensure high levels of presentation.

 To adopt a common approach towards handwriting by all adults when writing in children’s books, on the whiteboard or on displays / resources.

 Children to achieve a neat, legible style with correctly formed letters in cursive handwriting.

 Children to develop fluency and speed whilst writing, so that eventually the children are able to write the letters with confidence and correct orientation.

Teaching and Learning

 As recommended by the British Dyslexia Association, we adopt a continuous cursive style of writing.

 Teachers and Learning Support Assistants model the agreed cursive style when modelling writing both in class, on displays and in feedback in books.

Development of learning and teaching handwriting

EYFS

On entry, children are involved in a variety of activities to develop essential pre-writing skills in line with the Early Learning Goals of the Foundation Stage. They are introduced to actual letter formation in conjunction with the introduction of phonic skills. Children are taught to form letters correctly, paying attention to the starting point for each letter, the direction of pencil movement, the shape and orientation of the letter, and the relative heights of the body of each letter, and any ascender and descender. Children are encouraged to work towards a tripod grip.

Activities to develop gross motor control are multisensory and appropriate to the needs of the child. They may include: rolling hoops and running with a hoop, ribbon movement, chalking, painting on a large scale and marking making in foam, sand and on the Interactive White Board.

Activities to develop fine motor control are multi sensory and appropriate to the needs of the child. They may include: sand, Roll n’ Write, mark making trays and tools, tracing, colouring within guide lines and pictures, pattern work, using glue spreaders in small pots, painting with the tips of the fingers, cotton buds, plasticine and threading.

Year 1 and 2

As the children move to Year 1 the skills acquired in the Foundation Stage are continued, consolidating correct formation, concentration and accurate precision work. The formation of individual letters are introduced in groups of similarly formed letters and practice of these takes places in short regular bursts, within phonics lessons as new sounds are introduced. Sessions begin with a multisensory approach, where children use their ‘magic finger pencils’ in the air, on their hand, on their partners’ back. They are also encouraged to verbalise the movements of their finger/pencil (e.g. i – “down the body and dot the head”). The teacher then models writing on the board and the children are given the opportunity to practise their letters in the air, on whiteboards, paper or in books. When using paper, all children write in pencil. Spellings are closely linked with handwriting activities, assisting the children with phonic skills required for successful reading. As the children progress through Year 1 and into Year 2, they are shown how to use the individual leading lines to join pairs and groups of letters.

Year 3 – Year 6

The Cursive style continues to develop through close links with the National Curriculum. Handwriting practice is taught through phonic and spelling activities and as fluency and accuracy develops, pupils are encouraged to write with an ink pen. Handwriting is timetabled in short, regular sessions and where possible is integrated across the curriculum, e.g. practicing scientific vocabulary, cloze procedure linked to history.

All handwriting activities are undertaken as class activities for the following reasons:

    • to develop effective and efficient pen hold
    • to develop the habit of concentration which is crucial to good handwriting
    • to encourage the development of cursive script, neatness and legibility
    • to provide the class teacher with the opportunity to help assess individuals’ progress and monitor areas requiring reinforcement.

The use of Technology

All teachers use the Interactive Whiteboard in direct teaching: use of the lined writing templates are an essential tool for learning, as the teacher can demonstrate the correct letter formation and joins clearly to the whole class at once if necessary. Younger children rehearse ‘large letters/joins’ on a blank screen, using different colours and thicknesses of line.

Handwriting and Reading

At Leopold, children are exposed to both cursive and print styles as well as commercial print. They develop awareness for reading in print and writing in cursive side by side in their learning, such as prompts around classrooms/school – teachers lettering, labels on displays/teaching aids e.g. alphabet on tables and through teachers modelling of writing.

Left Handed Children

Each left-handed child is identified to ensure that writing conditions are suitable. The following guidelines are useful to help left-handed children.

Guidelines for writing left-handed:

    • The writing surface and chair are suitable for the child’s own height and allows them to sit appropriately
    • The child sits towards the left of their partner leaving plenty of space for writing on the left side of his/her – mid line (this allows maximum space for arm movement)
    • A writing tool which does not smudge.

In line with the National Curriculum (2014) expectations for handwriting children will learn about the groups of letters that require similar techniques to form. From the summer term of Year 2 pupils can earn a ‘Pen Licence’ once they can write cursively in a legible and consistent way.

Signed: Headteacher ……………………………………………………………

Signed: Chair of Governors ……………………………………………………….

Date:

Review: This policy will be reviewed ____________.

October 2015

Help for parents with reading at home

Key Stage 1

Key Stage 2

Literacy Overview 2015

Term

Year 1

Year 2

Year 3

Year 4

Year 5

Year 6

Autumn 1 Labels, lists and captions

Stories with familiar settings

Recounts

Grammar Focus

Naming the letters of the alphabet in order.

Introduction to capital letters, full stops, question marks and exclamation marks to demarcate sentences

Capital letters for names and for the personal pronoun I

 

Separation of words with spaces

Saying out loud what they are going to write about.

Handwriting Focus

Use handwriting patterns to establish rhythm and control in writing, using a comfortable and efficient pencil grip.

Form lower case letters correctly in a script that is easy to join later.

Sit correctly at a table holding a pencil comfortably and correctly.

Stories in familiar settings

Description:

Explore familiar settings. Children generate ideas and plan a story about an animal that lives in their house under the stairs. There is a focus on using simple punctuation and story problems and solutions.

Grammar focus:
1. Learn how to use punctuation correctly, including capital letters, full stops, question or exclamation marks

2. Learn how to use sentences with different forms: statement, question, exclamation, command.

Postcards & Letters

Description:

Be inspired to write letters with fantastic excuses. Create an illustrated letter describing an amazing adventure. Find out about telegrams & emails.

Grammar focus:
1. Learn how to use punctuation correctly, including capital letters, full stops, question or exclamation marks

2. Learn how to use sentences with different forms: statement, question, exclamation, command.

Songs and repetitive poems

Description:

Read and enjoy poems with repeating patterns. Then write some of your own about what you see when walking to school, focusing on using fantastic adjectives. Look at patterns in songs by learning, singing, writing and performing rounds.

Grammar focus:
1. Use expanded noun phrases to describe and specify, e.g. adjectives to describe nouns

2. Use and understand grammar terminology

Fiction – Stories by the Same Author

Non-Fiction – Instruction and Explanations

Poetry – Creating Images

Stories with from the same author.

Stories with similar settings

Instructions and explanations

Information texts

Fiction 1- myths and legends

Fiction 2 – Classic fiction

Non-fiction 1- Recounts

Fiction 1 – Classic fiction

Fiction 2 – biographies and autobiographies

Autumn 2 Recounts

Poems about the senses

instructions

Grammar focus:

Naming the letters of the alphabet in order.

How words can combine to make sentences

Joining words and joining sentences using and

 

Separation of words with spaces

Re-reading what they have written to check that it makes sense.

Traditional Tales

Description:

Explore the brilliant fables: The Frog and the Scorpion and The Ant and the Grasshopper. Write a dialogue between grasshopper’s indignant sister and the cruel ant! Look at compound sentences and storytelling skills. Write a fable.

Grammar focus:
1. Co-ordination: use conjunctions (and, or, but) to join simple sentences
2. Learn how to use punctuation correctly, including capital letters, full stops, question or exclamation marks

Information texts

Description:

Kick starting this unit about pets, children will read the lovely books, Dogs and Matilda’s Cat. They will compare these books to information texts before researching and creating their own information pages on an unusual pet!

Grammar focus:
1. Use expanded noun phrases to describe and specify, e.g. adjectives to describe nouns

2. Learn how to use punctuation correctly, incl. capital letters, full stops, question or exclamation marks

Traditional poems for young children

Description:

Read, enjoy and learn by heart, Edward Lear’s wonderful nonsense poem The Owl and the Pussycat. Find out about Edward Lear and explore some of his limericks. Read limericks written by other people. Have fun writing a limerick with support.

Grammar focus:
1. Use expanded noun phrases to describe and specify, e.g. adjectives to describe nouns

2. Use and understand grammar terminology

Fiction – Stories from other Cultures

Non-Fiction – Information Texts

Poetry – Humorous Poems

Non-Fiction – Christmas Letters

Poetry 1: Image poems

Poetry 2: Poetic form – syllabic poems

Non-fiction 2-instructions and explanations

Poetry 1- Slam poetry

Poetry 2 – Classic poems

Non-fiction 1 – recounts

Non-fiction 2 – instructions and explanations

Poetry 1 – slam poetry

Poetry 2 – classic poetry

Spring 1 Pattern and rhyme

Patterned stories and other culture

Information Text

Instructions

Grammar focus:

Regular plural noun suffixes –s or –es (e.g. dog, dogs; wish, wishes)

Using –ing, –ed, –er and –est where no change is needed in the spelling of root words

The use of   capital letters, full stops, question marks and exclamation marks to demarcate sentences

Capital letters for names and for the personal pronoun I

 

Separation of words with spaces

Traditional tales from a variety of cultures

Description:

Read & compare Hansel & Gretel & Baba Yaga using drama & story maps. Discuss joining sentences using or, and or but. Children write witch stories using story pegs to plan. Introduce some ‘story language’ & encourage interesting endings.

Grammar focus:
1. Use conjunctions ‘and’, ‘or’, ‘but’ to join sentences

2. Use ‘when’, ‘because’, ‘if’, ‘where’ etc. to create subordinate clauses.

3. Demarcate sentences using capital letters, full stops, question or exclamation marks

Instructions

Description:

Use Instructions by Neil Gaiman to introduce children to writing instructions. Explore features of instructions including bossy verbs. Identify exciting tricky words & discuss how to decode them. Children write instructions using stimulus of map of Fairy-tale Land.

Grammar focus:
1. Demarcate sentences using capital letters, full stops, question or exclamation marks.

The Senses- Poetry

Description:

Explore the senses through poetry. Read a range of different poems and learn some by heart. Go on a poetry walk to the playground or nature area to collect some wonderful describing words. Write simple poems using adjectives and adjectival phrases.

Grammar focus:
1. Use expanded noun phrases to describe and specify, e.g. adjectives to describe nouns

2. Use and understand grammar terminology

3. Use ‘when’, ‘if’, ‘that’, ‘because’ to create subordinate clauses.

Fiction – Myths and Legends

Non-Fiction – Recounts

Poetry – Traditional Poems

Fiction 3: Myths and legends

Non-fiction 3: Recounts

Fiction – Short stories – mystery

Fiction – Drama

Non-fiction – Argument and debate

Fiction 3 – Short stories – mystery

Fiction 4  – Drama

Non-fiction 3– Argument and debate

Spring 2 Stories with familiar settings

Recount

Grammar focus:

Suffixes that can be added to verbs (e.g. helping, helped, helper)

The use of   capital letters, full stops, question marks and exclamation marks to demarcate sentences

Capital letters for names and for the personal pronoun I

 

Separation of words with spaces

Stories involving fantasy

Description:

The children are introduced to The Dragon Machine by Helen Ward and other well known dragon stories. They create a dragon and write similes to describe it. They then write dragon stories with a focus on using conjunctions to write longer sentences.

Grammar focus:
1. Use adjectives to describe nouns

2. Use conjunctions ‘and’, ‘or’, ‘but’ to join sentences 3. Use conjunctions (when, if, because) to add subordinate clauses

Recounts

Description:

This plan is a unique twist of a recount plan. Based on the lovely story Diary of a Wombat, children use conjunctions to expand sentences before writing their own recounts in a diary form about an English animal. Grammar focus:
1. Learn how to use punctuation correctly, including capital letters, full stops, question or exclamation marks.

2. Use conjunctions ‘and’, ‘or’, ‘but’ to join sentences

Humorous poems

Description:

This unit is based around the wonderful poem, Aliens Stole My Underpants. Children will memorise and perform this poem, describe objects to aliens using adjectives before finally writing their own alien poems.

Grammar focus:
1. Use expanded noun phrases to describe and specify, e.g. adjectives to describe nouns

2. Use and understand grammar terminology

Fiction – Stories about Imaginary World

Non-Fiction – Non-chronological reports

Poetry – Performance Poems

Poetry 3: List poems and kennings

Poetry 4: Performance poems

Non-fiction – Reports and journalistic writing

Poetry – Classic narrative and oral poems

Poetry – Poetic style

Non-fiction 4 – Reports and journalistic writing

Poetry 3– Classic narrative and oral poems

Poetry  4– Poetic style

Summer 1 Traditional tales and fairy tales

Poems on a theme

Stories about fantasy world

Grammar focus:

How the prefix un– changes the meaning of verbs and adjectives (negation, e.g. unkind, or undoing, e.g. untie the boat)

The use of capital letters, full stops, question marks and exclamation marks to demarcate sentences

Capital letters for names and for the personal pronoun I

 

Separation of words with spaces

Quest and adventure stories

Description:

Children read a range of quest stories, exploring structure and language choice. They explore 4 types of sentence and experiment with tense. Children write their own extended stories, concluding by performing their writing to a younger child.

Grammar focus:
1. Identify and use sentences with different forms

2. Use and distinguish past and present tense

3. Learn how to use familiar and new punctuation

Information texts

Description:

Children learn about the different dinosaurs in Harry and the Bucketful of Dinosaurs. They explore the features of information texts and write a fact file about a dinosaur. They write questions, design a quiz and use past and present verb tenses.

Grammar focus:
1. Learn how to use past and present tense correctly including the progressive form

2. Learn how to use familiar and new punctuation

Favourite poems

Description:

Children listen to and read a range of poems of different types. They choose their favourite of each type and write it out in their best handwriting. Discuss punctuation used in poetry and the features of good handwriting. Children recite their favourite poem from home.

Grammar focus:
1. Use a variety of end of sentence punctuation.

2. Use capital letters for the start of lines in poems.

3.   Begin to use commas correctly.

Fiction – Adventure Stories

Non-Fiction – Persuasive Writing

Poetry – Traditional Poems

Fiction 5: Adventure Stories

Fiction 6: Plays and dialogues

Non-fiction 5: Persuasive writing

Non-fiction 6: Non-chronological reports

Poetry 5: Traditional poems

Poetry 6: Shape poems

Fiction – Classic fiction

Fiction – Short stories- fantasy

Non-fiction 1- Persuasive writing

Fiction  5- Classic fiction

Fiction 6 – Short stories- fantasy

Non-fiction 5- Persuasive writing

Summer 2 Stories from a range of cultures/Stories with predictable

and patterned language

Poem on a theme

Grammar focus:

The use of capital letters, full stops, question marks and exclamation marks to demarcate sentences

Capital letters for names and for the personal pronoun I

 

Separation of words with spaces

Stories by the same author: Anthony Browne

Description:

Children read and discuss some wonderful Anthony Browne books looking at the features that make them distinctive. They use skills of inference to interpret the stories and create characters for an illustrated story book of their own, based on The Night Shimmy.

Grammar focus:
1. Use past tense consistently

2. Use subordination and co-ordination writing sentences with two main clauses or with subordinate clauses

Recounts

Description:

Children learn about the structure and vocabulary of recounts first by listening to, reading and writing fictional recounts. Then they plan and write a recount from their own experience using conjunctions to write longer sentences.

Grammar focus:
1. Use subordination and co-ordination writing sentences with two main clauses or with subordinate clauses

2. Punctuate questions with question marks and sentences with full stops and exclamation marks.

3. Use grammatical terminology

Really looking! Poems about birds

Description:

Children use their imagination to write a class poem about where they would go if they could fly like a bird. They look at eagles and swans and find exciting vocabulary. Then they write short poems based on haiku about birds that interest them.

Grammar focus:
1. Use expanded noun phrases in writing descriptions

2. Use familiar and new punctuation correctly,

Fiction – Plays and Dialogues

Non-Fiction – Non-chronological

Poetry – Shape poems

Non-fiction – Non-chronological reports

Poetry – Debate poem

Poetry – The power of imagery

Non-fiction 6– Non-chronological reports

Poetry 5- Debate poem

Poetry 6 – The power of imagery